October 16, 2016

A Little Boy in Hiroshima

On August 16th 1945, the first atomic bomb ever used during a time of war was dropped on the city of Hiroshima, Japan. Of the approximately 140,000 people that died from “Little Boy” 70,000 were killed instantly. The Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall was the only structure inside the hypocenter to survive the blast. After living in Japan for two and a half years, I made up my mind that it was finally time for me to visit this world heritage site for myself. Three of my friends and I drove the four and a half hours up to Hiroshima one night to visit the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, Hiroshima Castle, and Itsukushima Shrine in Miyajima.

 

Hiroshima Peace Memorial

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Hiroshima Peace Memorial

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Hiroshima Peace Memorial

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Hiroshima Peace Memorial

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Hiroshima Peace Memorial

 

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Shrine

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Hiroshima Gokoku Shrine was destroyed by the atomic bomb but was rebuilt by donations.

 

Hiroshima Castle

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Also destroyed by the bomb Hiroshima Castle was rebuilt in 1958.

 

Hiroshima Castle

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It is now a museum that teaches people about Hiroshima’s history before World War II.

 

Itsukushima Shrine

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The Great Torii Gate at Itsukushima Shrine in Miyajima. The gate was first built in 1168 and although no longer original, the current gate has been in place since 1875.

Itsukushima Shrine

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Itsukushima Shrine became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996, and is considered a national treasure by the Japanese government.

Itsukushima Shrine

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